The Death of a Book Blog

Most of the readers who follow this blog are aware I have another blog – a promotional blog called Authors to Watch. For the past year, I have interviewed hundreds of authors, promoted hundreds of books, and posted dozens of reviews. What started out as a small blog that boasted the occasional post evolved into something quite substantial. Up until January, I posted on Authors to Watch several times a week. At one point, I posted every day.

In addition to the Authors to Watch blog, I also had a Facebook page and Facebook group. When the group grew to several thousand members, we took on extra admins for a total of six. Six admins might seem like a lot, but we couldn’t keep up with the spam, so we posted some rules essentially changing the group to a discussion-only forum (no promotion allowed). When the rules were repeatedly broken by spam-and-run authors, we changed the settings so that only admins could initiate a thread. Our core group of members loved the changes. We had some lively conversations (sometimes resulting in disputes that had to be settled by admins), but our discussion threads were often marred by authors who couldn’t seem to resist dropping a promotional post and then running. After a few months, I became tired of being bombarded by angry authors demanding that I kick so-and-so out of the group because they hurt their feelings on a discussion thread. I got tired of being messaged by authors who wanted to know why their “posting rights” were revoked just because they dropped a bit of semi-pornographic spam on a discussion thread that was meant to be about creating realistic dialogue. When I made the announcement that the group was being deleted, a few authors (who were complete strangers to me) got together demanding that I turn the group over to them. I ignored them, deleted the group, and have never lost a night’s sleep.

Now the time has come for the blog to take a bit of a break. Or for me to take a break from the blog. Like most book bloggers, I work outside the home, take care of a family, and try to scrape together a moment or two to write. Like most book bloggers and authors (and like most people in general), I’m busy. Book blogging is something I’ve done because I love it. I love helping authors. I love giving authors a platform to promote their books and talk about their writing process. Or, at least, I used to.

Don’t get me wrong. I still love helping authors. I just need to do it in a different way. I’m sure some of you will encourage me to stick it out. You’ll tell me to get back to Authors to Watch in a couple of months when I’ve recovered from my recent health crisis. And maybe I will. But right now, I really, really, really need a break.

I’ve thought about ending the blog for a long time, but then some starry-eyed, new author would come along asking me to promote their book, and their genuine kindness would sneak past my defenses, and I’d be back to interviewing once again. For every amazing, wonderful, genuine, kindhearted author I’ve encountered, there’s been at least one entitled, demanding, ungrateful author whose made me wonder why I spent my free time helping them.

I’ve stayed up late to format interviews when I’m so tired, all I want to do is pass out on the floor. I’ve promoted interviews in the morning before I’ve rushed off to work and promoted the moment I got home. I’ve read books I’ve agreed to review by a certain date even though it meant putting my own writing (or housecleaning or spending time with family) on the back burner.

I’m not special. Every book blogger is busy. They tirelessly promote because they love books and they want to help authors. Over the past three years, I’ve seen several book bloggers quit. Some are no longer accepting review requests outside of book tours. Some aren’t accepting self-published authors at all. The flood of requests (many from rude authors who don’t read their guidelines) have pushed these book bloggers to put strict limitations on who can approach them. Emails are deleted without reading them. Authors are ignored.

It’s tough for both authors and book bloggers. There’s such a huge need for reviewers, bloggers are being overwhelmed by requests, while authors are wondering how the hell to get the word out about their book.

As an author and a blogger, I’m on both sides of the fence. I know how hard it is to be inundated by a dozen review requests per day. I also know how exhausting it is to send out dozens of review requests and only hear back from two bloggers. As an author, I respond to each and every author who wants to be featured on Authors to Watch. I might not respond to publicists, but I would NEVER ignore an author who contacts me directly because I know how badly it sucks to be ignored.

Authors, before you contact a reviewer or book blogger, please be mindful of their time. Bloggers are doing everything they can to help you. The majority of authors are polite, but many are not. Some bloggers (like me because I’m a pushover) will try to accommodate every author, even the rude ones, but most bloggers aren’t going to give you a second chance.

Every book blogger has their own rules and pet peeves. Here’s what really pushed me over the edge:

  • Rude authors: These are authors who, for whatever reason, lack in social skills. Maybe their intentions are good, but from reading their terse emails, it’s hard to tell. “This needs to be changed.” Or, “You need to add this link.” One-line emails or comments that make demands are not a nice way to address the book blogger who was up half the night fighting with their internet service in order to get your post formatted. If you need the book blogger to make changes, that’s fine. But be nice.
  • Demanding authors: If you see something that needs to be changed or added in your promotional post, most book bloggers are more than happy to help. ASK nicely. Don’t demand. Don’t email the book blogger repeatedly throughout the day, wondering why the link (that you provided incorrectly the first time, by the way) hasn’t been fixed yet. Book bloggers don’t spend their lives glued to their computers waiting on correspondence from you. When someone is doing something for you for free, you have no rights to make demands. Ask.
  • Entitled authors: While demanding authors are often perfectionists who can’t relinquish control over a blog that isn’t theirs, entitled authors make demands because they feel like everyone owes them unlimited time. Entitled authors are the only authors out there. They wrote a book, so the rest of us should bow down to them. As for the other authors out there, we pale in comparison to the entitled author. Entitled authors interview the book blogger ahead of time to make sure they’re worthy. They ask the book blogger how many page views they get per day and what they’re going to do to promote the post. The entitled author checks in with the book blogger throughout the day to make damned sure the blogger has promoted. “I didn’t see anything on Twitter yet.” The entitled author leaves nothing to chance. “You might want to mention that I placed runner-up in the Obscure Book Cover Award,” or, “You might want to change your post so that it shows my promotional price in bold letters” or, “You might want to Tweet again in the afternoon so more people see the post.”
  • Too busy to read the guidelines Authors: These are the authors who skim through the Contact Me page and grab your email without reading any of the guidelines. Never mind that the book blogger isn’t accepting reviews at this time. They email the blogger a copy of their book anyway and expect them to review by a deadline they set. They follow up with constant demands, asking when they can expect the review to post. Hmmm. How about never?
  • Ungrateful Authors: These are the authors who don’t bother to thank the blogger for their time. I guess this goes back to a sense of entitlement. Or maybe the author just got so busy, they forgot to send the blogger a quick email to thank them. Book bloggers aren’t looking for much, but a simple “thank you” goes a long way. That’s all we want.

For those of you who have been interviewed or reviewed on Authors to Watch, don’t worry! I do plan to renew the domain, so links to your reviews and interviews will stay intact. For those who have already set up an interview or book feature for October or November, have no fear. I will definitely follow through on posting and promoting your feature. (Hey, I even fixed a link and Tweeted while in the hospital.)

Don’t be surprised if I’m back to Authors to Watch in the new year when things settle down, but don’t be surprised if I’m not. Who knows what the future might bring? Just know that I’m still fully supportive of the author community and will help indie authors when I can. Be kind to book bloggers and to each other. And, most importantly, be kind to yourself. Your time is important. Don’t give it away to anyone.


75 thoughts on “The Death of a Book Blog

  1. I’m so sorry to hear how hard it’s been. You put so much time into it, and you get the occasional smile and bags of stress in return. It shouldn’t be like that. So, if you gotta go, you gotta go. The rest of us, we’ll go bother someone else. 🙂 Just kidding. I’ve enjoyed your reviews. Good luck.

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  2. I’m so sorry to hear you have had so much trouble from some authors, Tricia. Your blog offers a great promotion service to all of us, but as is usual … a few bad apples. I hope your health recovers soon and that you are able to carry on with this main blog of yours as well as your own writing. Thank you so much for maintaining the site and the interviews and reviews you’ve already done for all of us. Your interest in, and support of, our writing are very much appreciated.

    As for my own promotion blog, I’ll be taking a break during November as well, mainly so I can get back to my own writing. But I will also be taking a different tack with it when I return. I’ve found that so few of the authors I have promoted have ever bothered with this one sentence in the agreement: In exchange for this free listing, I request that all authors reciprocate by promoting Reading Recommendations. their fellow authors listed on the site, and me and my work as much as possible.

    A few authors have more than made up for this lack in the others, but it’s still very disappointing to be giving away all of this free promotion (not to mention the amount of work I put into this) only to never hear from those authors again.

    Get well soon!!

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    1. It’s good you’re taking a break, Susan. I’m sorry authors aren’t following through on helping to promote your blog. I’ve had that problem with ATW. I hoped to create a community where authors help each other, but for the most part, I never heard from authors after their post appeared. If I return to blogging in the future, I’ll probably try a new format. Interviews are time-consuming for the author to fill out and time-consuming for me to format. There has to be an easier way for both the author and for me. As for demanding authors, I really need to grow a backbone and tell the bad apples to scram.

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  3. Hi Tricia. I followed Susan Toy in. I’m a new Author on a very busy street, and I’m sorry we won’t get to meet in an interview, but I hear some optimism in your post. Hospital I know too well, but healing time needs to take as long as it takes, for body and soul. This might be a good time to get back to writing. Use your pain and channel that emotion through your very talented imagination. Get well and be well
    Lockie

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    1. Thanks, Lockie. Maybe when I’ve recovered in body and spirit, we’ll meet in an interview on Authors to Watch. I’m optimistic that I’ll go back to blogging when I’m ready. Hopefully I’ll find a better way to balance the demands of blogging and find ways to set limits with authors who are too demanding. 🙂

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  4. This speaks very loudly for me as well.

    We’re often at a loss, as we try to meet the needs of those who desperately seek promotion, and those who require isolating a certain audience, the way our blog(diversity is our key point) does.

    But we get so many requests and DEMANDS, that authors often make it very easy to ignore them. Diversity means something extremely different to those who are the least exposed to it, and positive representation is even more difficult.

    The biggest offenders are those who dont read policy guidelines. So honestly, as great as a resource is, and as big as your platform is, you’re not obligated, and dont owe others anything.

    I think most book bloggers start out taking everything, but several bad experiences make them turn away. I know with us, because diversity means something different those straight, abled, men, or anything otherwise seen as a “default” narrative, having sprinkles of color and disability seems diverse, but it tends to piss authors off when we tell them side characters with marginalization isnt enough.

    Tricia, you’re much too nice =)

    Hoping all the best, whichever way you decide to go, but you are not alone in how you feel.

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    1. I’m so sorry you’re having problems already. With ATW, I interviewed authors of every genre, so there wasn’t much of a screening process. I imagine it’s difficult when you’re trying to explain to authors why their book wouldn’t be suited for your blog or blog tour. Many readers and writers don’t understand what diversity in literature means, so there’s a steep learning curve. I hope things get better for you.

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  5. I have seen so many of these kinds of authors posting in different forums that I can only imagine what sort of mail that book bloggers must get. It’s kind of put me off self-promotion, actually, because I don’t want to be seen as one of THOSE kinds of authors.

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    1. I feel the same way. I don’t do a lot of self-promotion because there seems to be too many authors out there screaming “buy my book.” For me, it’s much easier to promote someone else than it is to promote myself.

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  6. First I hope things are better soon for you! HUGS!!

    Second – YES!!!!! that list you have? Those don’t just apply to book blogs, that apply to book covers, too. Those same attitudes are right there – “Why haven’t you made THIS correction that was usually MY fault to begin with already?” “Why isn’t MY cover the most important?” – I literally had an author once demand that I work ONLY on HER cover until it was finished because she had used another artist who worked on more than one at a time and she felt that it slowed them down too much. Then there’s “I’m too busy to read your website, so tell me all the details on how you do covers/how much you charge, etc. Because MY time is too valuable to spend looking you up.” Or “Send me sample of your work in my email because I don’t have time to follow your links or look through the portfolio on your site” and then my favorites are “Well, you’ve made ten corrections, bought an image, and everything else, but I have changed my mind and a friend of mine is going to slap some words on a photo. Which means I’m not paying you. Bye-bye.” Or, “That cover looks great, but 45$ is too much, so I am only going to pay you half of it, and you can like it or leave it.” or the absolute best are those who pay, get their cover, and then put a stop payment on it through paypal.

    So I understand exactly what you mean – after awhile it just drains your soul and you dread even looking in your inbox. And when I get to that point I slap a sign up that says “I’m not taking new clients”, I set my mail to an autoreply that says “I’m busy, so see so and so and so and so for covers” and I either don’t do any, or else only work with authors who aren’t like that until i have recuperated enough that I can face them again and take that behavior in stride, and sometimes its a week and sometimes it’s months, and one day the time will come when it stretches from months to a year and eventually years and I’ll give it all up. Maybe you’re to the point now, or maybe you’ll come back to it, but in the end you have to do what’s best for you.

    Okay, I’ll end this long winded comment now, LOL!

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    1. That is just astounding! I can’t believe people would steal book covers. That’s what they’re doing when they stop payment or try to force a negotiation after they’ve already agreed to a price. They’re stealing. I’m so sorry that has happened to you. I don’t blame you for cutting off new clients. I imagine you get burned out in a hurry. People really need to think about their behavior and how they treat others. What a shame!

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  7. Tricia,

    I’m sorry that there has been so much stress on you during all of this. I know that you care a lot about your authors and the blog, but I do agree that you need to take some time for yourself. You’re running yourself ragged and you need to breath. As you said, you need time to focus on your own work. Glad you’re doing better.

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    1. Thanks Maegan. I think my recent health issues have forced me to take a step back, but honestly, it’s something I’ve considered for a while. You were around during the ATW group drama, so you know more than anyone how badly some authors can behave online.

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  8. Sorry to hear all the reasons you have for closing the blog, Tricia, but glad you are doing what you need to do for you. I’m glad you’ve had time for writing and publishing lately. And I’m grateful for the post you did for me on Authors to Watch.

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    1. Thank you! I don’t regret the time I’ve spent blogging. I’ve met some amazing people through Authors to Watch and blogging (like you!), so the time was well spent. Everyone needs a break from time to time. Hopefully I’ll come back to Authors to Watch with a better plan and a fresh perspective.

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  9. Tricia — There’s such a lack of professionalism, ethical behavior, and human kindness out there these days it makes me want to bring back spankings! Have they not been taught proper behavior by their parents or guardians? Are they just outright selfish and boorish? Have they never heard the Golden Rule? I prefer to stick with the over 50 crowd who remember when manners and kindness brought results. Today it takes an illness or death to hear kindness expressed,

    Lesson to be learned: Stay true to yourself, take care of yourself, put your own needs first. I fear we only receive respect today if we show respect for ourselves first, then to others. Renew your spirit and health, my friend, and come back refreshed and happy with your life.

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  10. I had to reply to this as i have had experience of all of it! As a book blogger myself I have come close to the same conclusion myself on a few occasions. I have spates of really quite awful encounters which set my teeth on edge and leave me wondering why I spend so much time on my blog promoting authors for free.

    I don’t expect authors to bow down in reverence to me when appearing on my blog or for a review I have done. I would like them to remember they have a guest spot/interview booked too so I don’t have to chase them up because they have forgotten. I have had authors who feel they are doing me a favour by sending me a free copy of their book and act towards me as if I am in their employment. I have received rude emails. Demands for ‘read by’ dates. Some who don’t bother to read my review policy and want me to sign up and download their book from somewhere else. All sorts! Then there are the ones which feel they have written the next Stephen King/J K Rowling/Dan Brown and if I can’t see that then I am a complete idiot… 😀

    Getting a review on a book blog is a way of rescuing your book out of the sea of publications, throwing it a life raft and getting it on to dry land where an honest, unpaid for review is taken far more notice of than some authors appear to realise. I have had good reports of sales based on reviews I have done and the satisfaction of bringing a great storyteller to the notice of readers of my blog and Twitter followers is enormous. I love the entertainment of the written word. I love finding talented authors and wonderful storytellers. The majority of authors have been LOVELY but there are some people (as in all walks of life) who need a bit of a reality check – how many people could you get to do hours of work for you for the virtual price of the commission made on one book and a single email? With reading time, review writing, promotions, drafting guest blogs and interviews I spend hours of my time on every book I review for free…all a book blogger wants in return is a little respect and courtesy – not a bad investment for any author hoping to sell their book 😉

    I hope your health improves soon, Tricia, all my hopes for a speedy recovery!

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    1. Thank you for everything you do for authors. It’s terrible to work so hard and be treated badly in return. The majority of authors are wonderful, but the bad ones can make blogging feel like a chore. Thanks for your well wishes!

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  11. I’m sorry to hear this. Even though we have not met, I send you a pat on the back for trying, for trying to help other authors. I can’t imagine someone being as you describe when you are only trying to help. As new authors, we need all the help we can get. I have the good fortune of having some very nice authors as guest writers and/or interviews on my blog which started as a vehicle to promote my own writing but evolved into a spot for others to share. This pleases me to be able to highlight other’s work. I hope I never run into rude people that I want to help, it would be extremely disappointing.

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    1. Kudos to you for reaching out and helping other authors. You’re right in saying we need all the help we can get. It’s hard to get the word out. I hope the rude folks stay far away from your blog so the nice, hardworking authors can still enjoy being featured there.

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    1. I’m not sure that I’ll do a Name and Shame, but I think I’ll make friends with my delete button. It’s easier to delete a rude email than it is to start a war. There are some crazy trolls out there. I don’t want to start a fight. Thanks so much for your support, Geraldine.

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  12. You are a very generous lady, Tricia, which is why you’ve been put upon. I have only done promotional posts on a limited basis and have experienced very little of the anti-social behaviour you describe. I have had the ingratitude, the authors who can’t be arsed to say thank you, but in that they are probably no worse than the average human group.
    Let it go, get on with your own writing and let the control freaks find somebody else to bother. Get well soon 🙂

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  13. The authors who don’t bother to read the submissions guidelines are the bane of every blogger who tries to help promote them.
    They get a surprise when they try that with me – just because I’m a big old cuddly furry ape:D
    They get a return email asking them to go read the guidelines and submit everything requested, or no posting!
    Most times they apologize and send the complete thing 😀
    Those that respond angrily get a terse message to the effect – suit yourself – I’m not paid by them so They’re not MY boss lol 😀
    Enjoy the rest Tricia – you’ve earned it 😀

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  14. I feel so sorry for you. Sometimes it seems that the self-publishing revolution has simply moved the slush pile away from editors and publishers and onto people like you. I have been so appalled by the way that some authors push their work that it has made it hard for me to promote my own.

    Something has got to give, But it mustn’t be your health. Have a well deserved break and time to think. It’s not you. It’s them. Sorry.

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    1. I know exactly where you’re coming from. Some of the behavior I’ve seen out there makes me reluctant to promote my own books. I’m so afraid of being pushy, I err on the side of barely promoting at all. As long as authors are polite, I don’t mind seeing self promotion. One of the biggest spammers/self-promoters I’ve seen in Facebook groups fights with readers on Amazon. With other authors, she’s merely pushy. With readers, she’s downright hostile. It’s baffling.

      I’m hoping once I get my health issues behind me, I’ll be ready to tackle book blogging once again. Thanks for your comment and for the reblog!

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  15. I have a policy on writer’s with vision where I only promote authors whose books I have actually read and that seems to work. If I knew there is a new release imminent I approach them direct and ask if they want to be featured. The Juliet blog is for crime authors only.but then I don;t ever have a queue of people asking to be featured. You deserve a break so take as long as you need.

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    1. I love your interviews, Juliet. Your approach is unique and one I might consider. I’ve approached a few authors after reading (and falling in love with) their books. I might take a “by invitation only” approach when I eventually start blogging on Authors to Watch again.

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  16. Being kind to authors is nice and thank you on behalf of all of us. But, remember you have to be nice to yourself too so try putting yourself first, we’re prepared to wait.
    xxx Huge Hugs xxx

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  17. Just found your blog post as Will Once reblogged it. I’ve seen this happening way too many times, and I’m really sorry this happened to you. At the end of the day, people should realise that you did them a favour, and that you don’t owe anything to any of us. I’m sorry these people have tarnished this experience for you and for others. It’s also a shame for the good authors out there. Take good care of yourself, take your time, and focus on doing things because you enjoy them, and not because you have an obligation to anyone. Maybe, when you come back, you will consider being the one initiating the blog post? By this, I mean you will go to the authors you know and the authors you like to promote them, and not act upon an email from someone you don’t know from Adam and Eve just because they read that you reviewed books and interviewed authors? My blog is not a reader’s blog, nor an author’s blog, and it’s quite new. I’ve been thinking of talking about the authors in my circles and their books at some point. But I think that’s the only way to protect myself from those who are just in “to get a little exposure and sod the rest”.

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    1. When I first started Authors to Watch, I usually initiated the interviews. I think I’d like to go back to that format, at least for a while. I would still like to feature books I read for pleasure. I’d also like to continue to promote authors, particularly the ones I know and respect. I just need to find a good balance so I’m not swamped by requests and demands. I wish you all the best with your blog and thank you so much for your comment.

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      1. Thanks Tricia, if that’s what pleases you, I hope you get back to blogging 🙂 But I understand about the “being swamped with requests and demands”. All in all, whatever you decide, for yourself, is going to be a good decision 🙂

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  18. Reblogged this on Sophie E Tallis and commented:
    So SO sad! Due to a few rotten apples, another great author and book blogger gets pushed over the edge. Being a writer is not an entitlement it’s a privilege, ALWAYS be courteous and grateful to those using their time to help YOU! 😦

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  19. Words utterly fail me! I cannot believe how some so called ‘authors’ behave! Being a writer is not an entitlement it is a privilege, something to be thankful for. Apart from the sheer bloody mindedness, arrogance and stupidity of people, how on earth do these people expect to be successful when they have no idea how to be professional? It is a BASIC rule to be courteous, a basic rule to say thank you. Ye gods, I am so SO sorry sweetie that you’ve had to swim through all this crap! I blame myself, I’ve been so tied up the last few months trying desperately to finish some short stories that I’ve been badly neglecting my blog and everyone else’s so I wasn’t aware of how bad things had become! What you do, is SOOOOOOO special, so wonderful, you give so much of yourself, your precious time, your many talents, just to help people and have it thrown back in your face? I’m not surprised you’ve had enough. But I do hope, as someone who loves reading your blog, that you are able to return to it one day. For now your health and happiness is the MOST important thing. Sorry for being so absent honey, if I’d seen some of the crap being pushed your way I would have jumped in and sorted them out! Grrrrrrrr.

    What really gets me, is that this sort of thing happens again and again. The sole reason that Waterstones in the UK (our version of Barnes & Noble) put in these dreadful tight restrictions against indie authors signing events, is people yet again, a few rotten apples were ruining things for the rest of us. They were literally accosting browsing customers in the shop and hoisting their books on them then frogmarching them to the tills!!! So now, virtually NO indie authors are able to get into the big stores. It infuriates me, an army of amateur idiots. It doesn’t matter whether you are published or self-published, people should ALWAYS be courteous and professional instead of self-obsessed narcissists! Ugh. I give up. I’m just so sorry that this sort of behaviour has happened to you sweetie, you are such a great friend to all authors, especially new authors and you really deserve to be cherished not bombarded, abused and treated badly. 😦

    Take care of yourself sweetie and I’m here anytime you need a good rant, cry, moan or anything. xxxxxxx

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    1. That’s such a shame that the actions of a few authors pushed Waterstones to ban all indies. It isn’t fair to authors and it isn’t fair to readers who are missing out on being introduced to some damned good books. It’s very sad to think that some adults never leaned the basics of courtesy and manners. I can’t imagine they’ll be successful in any venture if they alienate everyone around them.

      I’m quite certain I’ll return to Authors to Watch one day. There are too many exceptional authors and must-read books out there for me to stay silent for long. I’m going to try to take it easy for the rest of the year and see what 2015 brings. Thanks for being there, Sophie. You’re a good friend. ❤

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      1. Well so are you! We’ve both been through the agony of terrible publishers and I’ll never forget how amazingly supportive you were and what a huge difference it made. I can never thank you enough for all your comforting words and your wonderful wisdom, I only wished that I could wave a magic wand to cast all your troubles into Room 101 never to be seen again! 😦 Stay strong sweet lady and keep smiling, you truly are loved by so many people and certainly, despite an ocean between us, I consider you a DAMN good friend. Anytime you’re holidaying in the UK, you’re staying with me honey! 😀 xxx

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  20. I can relate. People often forget that they are getting something for “free” and when they get pushy and demanding it rubs the wrong way every time. Good to hear you know your own time limitations and all the best with your future plans! 🙂

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    1. I’m sorry you can relate. It seems a lot of book bloggers have had bad experiences. I guess the key is learning to set limitations and find balance. When I’ve learned to do that, I’ll be back to doing what I love!

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  21. It really is difficult some days to manage all of the tasks of blogging and also having a ‘real’ life outside of the virtual world. At one point I blogged a lot more and real life took a back burner and right now it’s the other way around. I am proud of you for putting your own needs (and family time) first and don’t look back! YOU know what feels right in your own heart. HUGS and hope you experience much less stress very soon.

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    1. Thank you, Christy. I’ve always appreciated your kindness and support, but I don’t think I’ve told you enough. THANK YOU for the tweets, virtual hugs, and positive posts on your blogs. ❤

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  22. That’s wee, Tricia. I’m so sorry to hear that. It always amazes me how unimaginative authors are when it comes to dealing with others. As an author, I often feel I’m fighting this endless battle to extrapolate the entire learning curve for my trade from total silence or the word ‘no’. So for me, when somebody actually treats me like a human being, the way you do, I hope I am duly appreciative. I am really sorry that people have been taking advantage of your kindness and generally being gits. I hope we will see you back again on ATW but I quite understand if we don’t.

    Take your time, let yourself heal, step back from it and relax. If it helps I do have a glimpse of insight into the difficulties of balancing Real Life with life as an author. McOther takes my work incredibly seriously considering the amount of time I spend on it and the seven tenths of bugger all I earn. And thank you.

    Thank you for featuring me. Thank you for taking the time and featuring everyone else. Thank you for reading your book before I read yours. Thank you for everything. Now go have a lie down, relax and get better. And the Box 010 post will be ready to go whenever you want it!

    Thinking of you.

    Cheers

    MTM

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    1. You are absolutely lovely, MT. I keep meaning to read the second book in your series, but time keeps flying away from me. Balance is always difficult when you’re an author. Sometimes real life has to take front seat. I went back to the day job yesterday (which was probably too soon), but resting any chance I have. I’m sure I’ll be back to Authors to Watch eventually, just not yet. Thanks for your well wishes and good thoughts. You’re truly a gem.

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      1. Bless you. That’s a lovely thing to say. Thanks. I am doing risibly badly at anything that doesn’t involve packing stuff into boxes and moving them away from pipes ready for the new heating to go in. I have been in this state for some weeks but I am almost in the home straight in that there may be days next week, I believe, when I can start writing again. Meanwhile, I want to read so many books and have failed dismally. However, give it a couple of weeks and I’m hoping to turn that around.

        Glad you’re on the mend and don’t work too hard! 😉

        Cheers

        MTM

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  23. I guess just like with any group, there are nice people and not so nice people who are authors. You need to take care of yourself. Take a break. You have been doing a lot of work to help other authors. You’ve given your time, the most valuable thing any of us have, and for that, you’ve had to put up with some not nice folks.

    Take a break and take care of yourself. We’ll still be here if you decide to come back. Good luck to you.

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  24. Hate to see Author to Watch go, whether or a while or forever, but you have to do what’s right for you. You are more important than your blog. You can do as much or as little as you want and still make a difference. You have a way with people and that will never change. I hope you are able to do more creative writing with your time and keep peace with your choice.

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  25. I am a bit late to come across this post but I have read every comment and it made me very sad. I am a newbie book blogger but after seeing so many people behaving like spam bots on social media, acting extremely rude and demanding, and reading countless posts in book blogs voicing experiences similar to your post here, I think there should be some kind of ‘Hall of Shame’ thing in the book blogger community. Like the top ten Tuesdays, maybe the last day of every month or something could be the Hall of Shame day, to expose and shame these people. This may sound harsh but the shaming and exposing is not a new concept and worked quite well in other niches/communities. Why not? That way genuine nice people won’t have to suffer the stigma crated by the rude and nasty authors out there.

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    1. It makes me sad too, Leona. The worst part is that so many bloggers have expressed frustration lately. Some are even quitting. When I wrote this post, I was barely out of the hospital. There was a rude comment from an author on one of my blog posts, basically demanding a new interview because the information on the old interview (from 2012) was out of date. It was the first time I’d heard from this person since the original interview. In fact, she’d never contacted me back in 2012 to thank me for promoting her. I know it probably sounds silly, but this was the straw that broke the camel’s back.

      Over the past couple of months, I’ve continued to promote on my book blog, but on a much smaller scale. When I receive rude emails or spam from people who submit materials without first contacting me, I delete their message. In the new year, I plan to continue with my blog. I enjoy meeting new authors and reading new books, so I refuse to let the actions of a few bad authors keep me from doing what I love.

      I hope you’ll continue with your own blog. What you do is vitally important. Thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

  26. I know I’m reading this late, but I came across it and thought it was a great post. There are too many badly behaved authors ruin it for the rest of us. These kinds of posts are important, to remind people that reviewers are giving up their free time. That they are supporting authors and in doing so the author needs to give back, at the very LEAST with good behaviour!

    Liked by 1 person

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